YouTube Marketing Promotion Tips From Desiree Martinez, Author Of ‘Innovation From Desperation: The Unfiltered Failures and Successes of an OG Social Media Marketer’

Desiree Martinez Author All In One Media

Desiree Martinez is the author of Innovation from Desperation: The Unfiltered Failures and Successes of an OG Social Media Marketer. She runs All-In-One Social Media, which helps businesses get more traction on their YouTube channels through social media.

GUEST: Desiree Martinez | Get Desiree’s book, Innovation from Desperation: The Unfiltered Failures and Successes of an OG Social Media Marketer | All-In-One Social Media | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | MrsDesireeRose.com

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HOST: The Video Marketing Value Podcast is hosted by:
– Dane Golden of VidiUp.tv and VidTarget.io | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube
– Renee Teeley of VideoExplained and ReneeTeeley.com | LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

SPONSORS: This episode is brought to you by our affiliate partners, including: TubeBuddy, VidIQ, MorningFame, Rev.com, and other products and services we recommend.

TRANSCRIPT

Desiree Martinez:
The secret to social media success is just telling your story and showing up to help people. It’s so easy for us to get wrapped up in things like, “I want to sell. I have all these objectives. I need to be showing off how awesome I am. #bestlifeever.” All of these things. At the end of the day, like being your truest, realest self is what’s going to connect best with people.

Dane Golden:
It’s time for the Video Market and Value Podcast. This is the podcast where we help marketers and business owners just like you, get more value out of your video marketing efforts. My name is Dane Golden from VidiUp.tv, where we help you up your game on YouTube for business and transform your viewers into loyal customers. And we’ve started a new project called VidTarget.io, where we help you save time and money through more targeted YouTube ads. And with my cohost, she’s the powerhouse video marketer from San Francisco and one of the women to watch, or one of the video marketers to watch in America. It’s R-E-N-E-E, T-E-E-L-E-Y, Renee Teeley. Welcome Renee, from VideoExplained.

Renee Teeley:
Hello, Dane. Today, I am happy as a kid with a never ending Gobstopper to be co-hosting this podcast with you.

Dane Golden:
But are you thrilled?

Renee Teeley:
I’m thrilled. I’m excited. I am all of the things.

Dane Golden:
She’s all the things. And Renee, what do you do at Video Explained?

Renee Teeley:
I do so many things at VideoExplained, but primarily, I offer video production and consulting services to help companies use video, to build credibility, generate leads, and convert those leads into paying customers.

Dane Golden:
Okay. And for you, the listener, you should know that as always, you can follow along on your podcast app with transcript and links, and send us a message on social media to let us know you liked the show. And today we have a special guest, it’s Desiree Martinez. She’s the author of Innovation From Desperation: The Unfiltered Failures & Successes of an OG Social Media Marketer. We’ve had her on before. She’s the CEO of All-in-One Social Media. Welcome Desiree.

Desiree Martinez:
Whoop, whoop, whoop. I’m so excited to be here, again. It’s so awesome to do this, this time with Renee as well.

Dane Golden:
She’s what makes it all worthwhile. She’s the one that makes this podcast work.

Renee Teeley:
Oh, such flattery.

Desiree Martinez:
I’m not going to lie, you’re right.

Dane Golden:
Now Desiree, we asked you on to the Video Marketing Value Podcast for the second time not only because you help YouTube creators and businesses promote channels with social media and blogs, but you also have written a book on it and your journey to get there. Let’s talk a little bit about your journey, but also you give us some tips on how social media can help marketers and businesses grow on a YouTube channel. Does that work? All that stuff?

Desiree Martinez:
You’re just asking for all of the things, but yeah, let’s break this down one thing at a time. So if I was to give anyone advice, remember guys, the number one thing I can tell you and I dive into it in my book, the secret… The secret, I’m going to fast forward to the end of my book, the secret to social media success, is just telling your story and showing up to help people. It’s so easy for us to get wrapped up in things like, “I want to sell. I have all these objectives. I need to be showing off how awesome I am. #bestlifeever. All of these, things at the end of the day, like being your truest, realest self is what’s going to connect best with people. And it needs to be a smattering of both the good stuff, the highlights, the accomplishments, like what you’re doing, how you can help people.
But if you can find a way to like dig into those vulnerabilities that’s going to allow people to truly connect with you and relate to what you’re going to, that is going to push you so much over the edge and turn just like followers, into those raving fans who truly trust you.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. That’s so amazing. Like great tips right off the bat. I want to start a little bit at the beginning though. So in your book, you said that you started to help both businesses with their social media and military spouses. So could you tell us a little bit more about those goals?

Desiree Martinez:
Yeah. So these are actually two separate things. So when I started as social media marketer, this was way back in 2010, like I became an official, like I put it in my papers with may state, filed for an LLC, and like became legit was on June 30th of 2010. And I was starting off as what ended up becoming, being a social media manager. Like I was figuring out and navigating this job that didn’t exist yet. Like there were a handful of people out there that were like doing social media marketing and management, and like starting to do this process of like educating brands, like what this is and why it’s important.
But I remember doing things way back in the day where it’s like, I would create Myspace pages for businesses, and figure out how they can be using Facebook to get started, and like how they just create like a personal account to connect with people, and like what they can do from there. This was back when, like you could create a business page and make a post and like every one who liked your page would see it and like it, and comment on it. Like this is like wild, wild West days, like the OG, original days of social. And so a lot of it was just kind of navigating like, what does it mean to be on social media, as a business and a brand? How do we share a voice? How do we accomplish our bottom line? How do we measure our return on investment for time and money?

Desiree Martinez:
And so a lot of my time was spent educating. It was a lot of like, “Okay, this is new and this is why you need to hire me to do it because this is what can happen.” And I’m not going to lie, I dealt with so many people, y’all has been 10 years, I still deal with people who are like, I just can have like my kid do that, or an intern do it, or I have a niece that does the Facebook, I’ll have her do it.” And this what I was dealing with even back when it started, like really hardcore. They didn’t understand why they would invest in it.

Desiree Martinez:
And so as it became more popular and recognized, where it came to the point where now, people will have social media platforms before they even have like a website or a service, and they’ll be this brand or this business, that functions without that .com. And it’s just really crazy to me, to think that like, that’s where we’ve come and it’s this thing that people still are unsure how to invest in it and what to do in it. And that’s why I’m really grateful that podcasts like this exist, and people like myself, and Dane, and Renee all exist so that we can help educate people and find a way for them to get to what they need to do to accomplish that goal.

Dane Golden:
And you’re very open in the book about your personal and business ups and downs that in many cases are quite harrowing and in some cases quite uplifting. And I’m sure I’m sure this is going to resonate with a lot of entrepreneurs. How did you decide to write the book and what were your goals in writing it?

Desiree Martinez:
So I love to read books. Specifically, I love to listen to books because becoming a mother fried my brain and so my focus is limited. So I’m really good at listening to books. So obviously, the audio book of my book will come out soon, but I love marketing books. I love business development. I love being able to dive into my industry and figure out how I can be better as an individual, so that I can then be better for my customers. And the more I listened to books, the more I would dive into these stories, the less I saw myself in the book. And the reason this is because is these great books are filled with monumental case studies and situations that are a little like problem, solution, idealistic kind of things, but also dealing with like really big brands of things. Like I remember reading talk Triggers with Jay Baer, and talking with him at great length about it.

Desiree Martinez:
But all of the brands that were doing these really great things were so much different than me and so much bigger than me. They weren’t ever about me, the individual, and like how I could be better as a person, how I could share my brand and my story. And it was when I also ran into this issue where I never got to read a book about a mom who was going through this stuff. You don’t find… Like if you ever talking about moms, it always seems to be in these memoir versions. Like your Becoming’s by Michelle Obama or you have your, Girl Wash Your Face’s, like where they’re like uplifting and inspirational.
And like those are the things that, I read those, I love them. I’ve gotten some of them, but it’s still not talking about business and the struggle of business, the struggle of doing something new, the struggle of being a woman, the struggle of being a mom, the struggle of having to deal with mental health issues, not just from myself, but from my spouse who was in the air force, and like what those things are like. All we ever seem to see are the case studies, and the surface levels of stories versus like the deep dive into the struggle, and how it affects us, and how it affects our business, and how we make decisions from those things that affect our decisions. And so I just wanted to talk about it.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. That’s really good. I love that motivation for writing the book too. And I’m always really impressed when authors will put in some of the real ups and downs, and the real challenges, and even a little bit of their personal life in it. And I’m slightly obsessed with business books. Like I’m constantly reading.

Desiree Martinez:
Same.

Renee Teeley:
I still actually buy print books, not even just reading them on my Kindle. I buy print books and actually read them. I have like shelves full of print books, love business books. But I do think that there’s something missing, which is those ups and downs, and there’s very few books that do that. I think a Lost and Founder is one of them. Moz kind of brings in …

Dane Golden:
That’s a very good book. Yeah.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. Rand Fishkin is the author, and he brings in a lot of his personal life into it and the ups and downs. And as an entrepreneur, like that actually really impacted me and made a difference. And so I think your book is going to make a difference to a lot of people as well. So kudos for actually pulling in some of your personal life and the real challenges and opening up about that.

Desiree Martinez:
Thinking about this book, this industry, you talk about the personal challenges, it’s all personal challenges. I do highlight… And like I said, I even tried when I had like my sub stories that are in the book from people that were accomplishing different things in life, they shared their personal stories about like how they led to where they’re at. Like one of my favorite stories is with Vincenzo Landino about how he was like, he literally can trace the success of his brand back to a night at a bar where he got stood up for a date and he just turned on Meerkat and was drinking fireballs and doing karaoke, like that. And it’s the story that I talked about in the book. And he’s like, “I can literally trace that success back to that moment.”

Renee Teeley:
Wow. I can’t.

Desiree Martinez:
… everything clicked for me. And it’s just so amazing to me, it’s like these intense stories, the intense moments that become so defining.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. I can’t imagine ever starting a story, like thinking that my night started off with fireball and singing karaoke.

Desiree Martinez:
Karaoke.

Renee Teeley:
That doesn’t seem like something I would do.

Desiree Martinez:
While live streaming it. Don’t forget the live streams.

Renee Teeley:
So let’s talk a little bit about your YouTube channel. So what inspired you to start your YouTube channel? How did you get started and what is it all about?

Desiree Martinez:
Sure. So I think this will actually link in with the other question you asked me about military spouses. So in 2015, I started my own social media marketing agency called All-in-One Social Media, where we focus on, do it for you services, in a package format geared towards like solopreneurs and small businesses that needed to develop an online presence and get some results, but mostly help build their brand. And the reason I created this is because at this time I was a military spouse. I was an air force wife, and I also remember very distinctly, my mother being a Marine Corps wife. And we had gotten stationed in Okinawa, Japan when I was a little kid. And she actually had to fly back to the States and live with her dad to get work, to send money, “back home” to me and my dad to help like with bills and management of money and stuff like that, because she could not get work.

Desiree Martinez:
And one of the things that’s really rampant in the military community specifically among spouses, is unemployment and underemployment are like rampant. It’s somewhere between 50 and 60%, the unemployment, underemployment, because we move so much. Companies don’t want to hire us because there’s this risk of us moving or leaving at any time. There’s also the concern that the mission always comes first versus most companies want like their companies, their jobs to come first. Because people like to say, “Oh, it’s the service member that serves,” well, when in fact, it’s like your whole family. When my husband would get called into work and called into a shop or called him cause something happened with the plane, I had to be there to watch my kids. So if like I had been at work and he was with our kids and he had to show up, I would have had to come home from work to take care of my kids. Right? So I get it from a business standpoint, but it doesn’t change the fact that it’s a serious problem.

Desiree Martinez:
And I was like, you know, we, as a community, as a culture have grown so much, where we can use social media anywhere that we are. And we’ve talked about in great length in our community that like there’s not a single military spouse that does not have a Facebook account purely because every single military base around the world has a spouses page and, or groups specifically for that. So they can join, ask questions, and build a community before they even get there so that they can learn. So with this knowledge, I was like, “I’m going to go start this agency and teach these military spouses how to be social media managers, what it takes to do this. And then I’m going to put them to work, helping brands grow their presence, that way they could work anywhere they’re stationed around the world.”

Dane Golden:
And just as a sampling, you don’t have to tell me where, but tell us about how many different places you’ve lived over the past 10 years.

Desiree Martinez:
Well, for myself personally, I lived in Phoenix, Florida, Texas, Korea, Las Vegas, and now I’m back in Phoenix. This is where my husband has since separated from the air force, and we bought our first home and everything here. So this is going to now be home. And for the first time in both my husband and I’s entire lives, we’re going to have roots. Because we both grew up military kids. It’s going to be very interesting come like the third or fourth year in this house and be like, “We haven’t moved. This is weird. So with the YouTube channel, so how the YouTube channel came is, my husband came home about 13 months after I had launched my agency and he was like, “Hey, we have orders to South Korea.” At the time we were living in Texas and I was like, “Okay.” Because that’s all you can really say. I’m sure there were some profanities, but this is one of those things that’s like, you have to adapt. And it was like, “Okay, besides figuring out how to move to the other side of the world, how am I supposed to run my business?”.

Desiree Martinez:
And so a couple months later a book came out that really resonated with me in a super deep, important way, and I will still reference it and I still turn to it, and it’s called, Vlog Like a Boss it’s by Amy Schmittauer Landino. And she talks about how she’s been able to use YouTube to build her career, and it all started by showing up on camera a couple times a week to solve people’s problems around social media and video marketing. Now, since then, her brand has obviously, it feels, completely pivoted for the better for her. But it really taught me, like I could be helping people with their social media and proving that I know what I’m talking about with YouTube.

Desiree Martinez:
And so when we moved to South Korea in 2017, I launched my channel in August just solving people’s problems. Like I answered questions that I was getting asked all of the times, and talking about content calendars, and how to do things, and what was what, and it was awful and awkward and terrible, but I had terrible lighting and I was using a webcam and I like was always sweaty because my room had no air conditioning and it’s August in the peninsula, so super hot. All of these things, but I showed up, that was what was important. I showed up every week to help people and do what I needed to do. And after I worked through my discomfort and I started to dive into how to do it better, it’s just become this great way to this day, with some of those actually original videos, it’s been a great way for me to generate leads for the different parts of my business.

Dane Golden:
And your company helps get more traction for businesses on their YouTube channels, through social media, which it’s one of the things you do. Could you talk about some of the ways you do that specifically, draw attention to YouTube channels?

Desiree Martinez:
So the number one way to draw attention to your YouTube channel is to solve problems based on search. So I spend time, I use a tool called TubeBuddy, which is an extension for your YouTube channel, which allows for you to take your videos and make sure that they can perform to their best by making sure you have the right keywords, right titles, thumbnails. It’s got a lot of data and testing options that are really great, but I started out using it and figuring out, “Okay, how can I make my videos better? How can I make sure they’re getting found?” And I use a keyword tool. I’m like, “Okay, I want to make a video about how to create a Facebook page. What’s the right way to get people to that video? What are people searching on Google and YouTube to get to like what they need?” And so that’s just what I started doing to get found.

Desiree Martinez:
And then from there, it’s kind of up to you to keep creating good content, keep improving, keep solving those problems. And eventually, the algorithm picks up what you’re doing on YouTube so that they can help put your content into this suggested part of YouTube. Where people are like, “Oh, rather than searching for problems, people that have watched my stuff or have been searching for similar solutions to their problems, they’re going to be able to get my videos served to them, so I can build up an audience that way as well.”

Desiree Martinez:
I also focus very much with my videos of always having a very specific call to action that allows for people to either subscribe to my channel and hit the bell so they get notifications or two, which is my preferred way, is to get on my email list. Because I email my list every week, new videos that I have going out. But I try to make sure to do it in a way that doesn’t sound like, “Here’s another email for your inbox. Because everyone wants more email.” I’m doing it in like my way, like with my quirks and my sass and my weirdness. And one of the things I think that keeps people around besides that I help them is that they’re like, “I just love that you keep it real.” I’m like, “You’re welcome.”

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. That’s definitely one of your selling points, keeping it real. I think that there’s definitely something to be said for that. So you mentioned that you connect with people on email. Let’s talk about some other ways that you are creating content and connecting with people. So for blogs in particular, how can blogs pair well with YouTube and how can it help your YouTube channel in some way?

Desiree Martinez:
So what I always tell everyone to do when it comes to YouTube, especially when they’re getting started, is that they need to approach this from the three friends. One is search, two is… Well it’s content, search, and then distribution, right? So the first thing is you have to make sure your content is going to solve people’s problems and get found in that search. The second thing that you definitely want to make sure that you’re focusing on is, how can I make sure this is getting found? That’s where tools like TubeBuddy are going to help you, through those keywords, those titles, and stuff like that. And I also think that goes into the next thing, which is distribution. When you’re using the right distribution channels, all of those two previous things work together. So I’m a big advocate that if you make a YouTube video, you need to make a blog to pair with it.

Desiree Martinez:
Because I can’t tell you how many people will tell me, my own friends, my own customers that are like, “I don’t want to watch your videos. I want to read them, because I can read faster than I can watch.” And I’m like, that’s a different way to respect my customer’s time. Right? I don’t do long fluffy videos to try and get AdSense or anything, I get to the point in my videos. To the point where I talk really fast and people will actually on my comments they’ll be like, “I love what you’re doing. You just talk so fast, I always have to rewind what you’re saying.” And I’m like, “It’s because I respect your time so much. Just want to get it all out there.”

Desiree Martinez:
But with the blog portion of it, if like you’re adding a blog for it, it’s because people can read faster. I can think of my mom. My mom is like this insane speed reader. And so she can read through a blog, digest my content before you’d even get to like minute two of my video. So it’s really about putting your content where people want to consume it, in the way that they want to consume it. So when I talk about distribution with people, and like you create this video as a pillar for what you’re doing, and then you create other content that can support it, like a blog, like Pinterest, like micro content for social media. Natively uploading that exact video to LinkedIn or to Facebook, doing those kinds of things, sharing it to your email list. All of these things work together to give your content the best chance for consumption.

Desiree Martinez:
So many people get wrapped up I think, when it comes to YouTube with like, “No, I only want people watching my YouTube videos.” And I’m like, “What’s more important that they watch your YouTube videos or that they consume your content and position you in their mind as an expert because you’re creating content where and how they want to consume it?”

Dane Golden:
And let’s dive in just a little bit more into that distribution, in that, this ongoing debate between the idea of doing it natively on a platform or just linking back to YouTube. Do you want to have something that sits on the other social media or links back?

Desiree Martinez:
As someone who studies algorithms, you need to know that if you’re going to do things that make the algorithms unhappy, you’re not going to have success on those platforms. And so every platform nowadays, is a special butterfly that wants to be special and like, they’re thought about like, they’re their own unique kid. It’s like a family, right? Like as a family you’d think they’d all work together, but no, each kid needs their own attention in order for them to like not misbehave and run amuck. Right? So YouTube needs to have its own thing. Facebook needs it’s own something. LinkedIn needs its own thing. Instagram needs its own thing. But you can still use it all as a base to put it in those places.

Desiree Martinez:
I also always like to tell people this like, “Look, the reason you want to make it on YouTube first is because it’s evergreen and it’s going to last for forever there. That’s the goal of that content. The reason that you put it on social networks is because it’s supporting the social network now. It’s supporting your brand now. It’s making those algorithms happy now. And YouTube wants you to create stuff now and for forever, like they want to like keep serving your content. If your content solves people’s problems, no matter how old it is, they’ll keep serving it to people.

Desiree Martinez:
But with Facebook, you don’t really search on Facebook for like “How to create a Facebook page” and go watch other people’s videos. But if I’ve put it up on my Facebook page and it so happens to be available when someone’s scrolling through my channel or it’s going to their newsfeed and I pop up, they’re more likely to probably watch a micro piece of content based on that. Where I’m giving them like helpful information or tips. Same with Instagram TV. Same with LinkedIn. LinkedIn is great for sharing information and being educational, but you just have to do it their way, videos less than 10 minutes, you have to embed your closed captions. It’s just all of the channels have their own quirks and you just kind of have to placate to it. That’s why I think it’s better to create less and do more with it.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. I think that’s definitely where YouTube really shines in terms of like, it is a video first platform. Where it is evergreen. You can continue searching on it within… I think that like LinkedIn, which I love LinkedIn as a platform, I love uploading videos to LinkedIn, but it has a very short shelf life. After two weeks, that video goes away. People aren’t searching for specific videos on LinkedIn or some other types of platforms. So that really is where YouTube comes into play, because it’s a video first platform. I want to play a quick game with you. Let’s do a little bit of social media lightning round. So say the first thing that comes into your mind when I ask these questions, but when it comes to video-

Desiree Martinez:
Okay. At your own risk.

Renee Teeley:
When it comes to video marketing, what is one good thing to remember when using Facebook?

Desiree Martinez:
Do long form videos, no longer than four minutes, but at least three.

Renee Teeley:
Okay. What’s one good thing to remember when using Instagram?

Desiree Martinez:
Use stories.

Renee Teeley:
Oh, that was nice. Short and succinct. I like that. Okay. What’s one good thing to remember when using Twitter?

Desiree Martinez:
Add three hashtags to your tweets, but make sure that they’re intertwined in the message.

Dane Golden:
Whoa.

Renee Teeley:
Oh, that’s good. That’s good. Okay. What’s one good thing when it comes to using Pinterest?

Desiree Martinez:
Your pins need to be appealing for the platform not related to your brand.

Dane Golden:
Yay!

Desiree Martinez:
No one cares about your brand. They care about the platform.

Dane Golden:
That was an amazing lightning round. Wow!

Renee Teeley:
Thanks for playing.

Desiree Martinez:
Yeah. You’re welcome. No LinkedIn love? No, just kidding.

Dane Golden:
We already asked about that. So is there any questions that we should have asked or you wished we had asked, but we didn’t?

Desiree Martinez:
I don’t know. That’s a good one. I could be super self centered and say like-

Dane Golden:
Be self centered.

Desiree Martinez:
I would be like, “What was the hardest or favorite part of writing my book or like my favorite part of my book?” I would love to ask you guys since you’ve read my book. What was your favorite part of my book?

Dane Golden:
I think the overcoming obstacles, it was woven throughout the book and how difficult, not only it is to be a mom and a military wife, but an entrepreneur which resonates with me the most. And it is a very relatable story because every entrepreneur has super challenges. So that’s why it resonated with me.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. Not to steal Dane’s answer, but that’s mine too.

Dane Golden:
No cheaters.

Renee Teeley:
It’s the same thing as what I brought up before with Lost and Founder’s, there’s very few books out there that I feel like really talk about challenges in a way that, it’s not necessarily that they’re talking about it because it’s good for business. Because I do feel like there are some stories out there that are like that, that like they talk about their challenges and how they’ve overcome them in a way that’s like really good for their business, that’s a selling point. But like, it doesn’t feel that genuine to me. That doesn’t seem to be the case with your book or Lost and Founder. Like I think that there’s something very powerful when people tell those stories.

Desiree Martinez:
Love it.

Dane Golden:
Okay.

Desiree Martinez:
That’s your reviews on Amazon tomorrow.

Dane Golden:
All right. We’ll do it.

Desiree Martinez:
No. I think that if I had to give any final thoughts or anything that I want people to remember when it comes to doing anything with video is that, I want you to remember these words, guys, you don’t look fat. You look fine. You sound great. You know what you’re talking about. The most important thing that you could ever do with video is show up. Push through all of whatever your discomforts may be and know that those are only your issues that are stopping you from doing what is needed to help people. If you have the way, if you have the system, the method, the advice that can help somebody, you are literally morally obligated to make sure that those people know. Don’t let your own-ness stop you from helping other people. And that can truly be accomplished the best way through video.

Dane Golden:
Very well spoken. Yay. So Desiree Martinez. We want to repeat what your products and your company is today and your book. So it’s Innovation from Desperation: The Unfiltered Failures and Successes of an OG Social Media Marketer. And your company is called All-in-One Social Media. How can people find out more about each of these?

Desiree Martinez:
You can go to mrsdesireerose.com, M-R-S-D-E-S-I-R-E-E-R-O-S-E .com. You can find services, learn about me and my unnatural Harry Potter obsession, right there.

Dane Golden:
Excellent. Thank you. Desiree Martinez. My name is Dane Golden and with my cohost, she’s R-E-N-E-E T-E-E-L-E-Y, Renee Teeley. And we want to thank you, the listener, for joining us today. Don’t we Renee?

Renee Teeley:
Yes, absolutely. And today I want to leave you with a quote. As I once told my good friend will Rogers, “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there. So make sure that you’re taking action every chance you get.”

Dane Golden:
I know who Will Rogers was. I’m not sure anyone else listening to this podcast will, but it’s a good quote. It’s a good quote.

Renee Teeley:
But hey, he’s my good friend. Yeah.

Dane Golden:
They’re all your good friends on this podcast. I want to invite you to review us on Apple podcasts. And if you can’t find that review button on your podcast app, if you click those three dots, you can click share, and then tweet us, Renee at rtlee and me at danegolden or mrsdesireerose, right?

Desiree Martinez:
Yep.

Dane Golden:
Okay. Let us know if you like the podcast, if you have any questions. Renee and I do this podcast and our various other YouTube videos and other projects because we love helping marketers and businesses, just like you, do YouTube and video marketing better. Thanks to our special guest Desiree Martinez. Until next week, here’s to helping you help your customers through video.