Should Your Business Podcast Be Livestreamed?

Should you livestream your business-related podcast? We talk about the 13 key factors you should think about when deciding what to do.

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HOSTS: The Video Marketing Value Podcast is hosted by:
– Dane Golden of VidiUp.tv and VidTarget.io | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube
– Gwen Miller LinkedIn | Twitter

SPONSORS: This episode is brought to you by our affiliate partners, including: TubeBuddyVidIQMorningFameRev.com, and other products and services we recommend.

PRODUCER: Jason Perrier of Phizzy Studios

TRANSCRIPT

Gwen Miller:
Every time I’ve been on a livestream podcast they have neglected to tell me it’s a livestream podcast. So, I come in in plaid and no makeup and no hair done and there are like cameras and I’m like, “Oh no!”

Dane Golden:
It’s time for the Video Marketing Value Podcast. This is the podcast where we help marketers and business owners just like you get more value out of your video marketing efforts. My name is Dane Golden from VidiUp.tv where we help you up your game on YouTube for business and transform your viewers into loyal customers and VidTarget.io where we help you get a higher return on your YouTube ad spend with targeted YouTube video placement lists. And that’s even more important now with the new iOS updates because Facebook is going to be a little bit harder to advertise on and YouTube ads can avoid most of those iOS 14.5 problems. And I want to talk to my co-host, it’s Gwen Miller. Hello Gwen.

Gwen Miller:
Hey Dane. It’s never a bad day to talk video marketing but this is an especially good one.

Dane Golden:
Why is that?

Gwen Miller:
I don’t know. It’s just, it’s just you know.

Dane Golden:
You’ve got nothing to back that up.

Gwen Miller:
It’s what you do on a fun afternoon is chat video marketing, right?

Dane Golden:
All right. Okay. And Gwen, what do you do?

Gwen Miller:
I work with creatives and brands to use data to craft better and better videos for their unique, one of a kind audiences.

Dane Golden:
Okay. And for you the listener, you should know that as always you can follow along on your podcast app right now with the transcript and links and do me a favor. I just compressed two feeds on iTunes and the feed we got has no reviews. So as you’re listening click those three dots and review our podcast as you are listening. So today’s topic came up because one of our loyal listeners Joe Mayer, or Meyer I’m not sure. He’s German so I’m not sure how you pronounce it or at least he podcasts in German.

Dane Golden:
So he emailed me last week and he says do I recommend livestreaming a podcast. And I get this question a lot or I hear people asking it a lot in forums and so forth and I have to say generally I will say no but not always is my answer. And we’re going to run through this because I have 13 different factors to help decide when to live stream a business related podcast. Now, this is emphasis on the business related podcast as opposed to more general entertainment talk, I would categorize that. As some podcasts like the Joe Rogan podcast is more general information and there’s a number of other podcasters who are doing it on YouTube that hey let’s face it that’s not a business specific podcast. So I’d make that distinction here. All right. Does that sound good Gwen?

Gwen Miller:
No, I know I’m excited for this topic. As you know I am new to the podcasting world so I am eager to learn from the expert.

Dane Golden:
I refuse to give you any caveats. You are an expert and we demand expert advice from you all right?

Gwen Miller:
I am very good at asking questions. I plan to ask you some very incisive questions today.

Dane Golden:
I want to start with preambles, just some background, sometime ago I helped run an early podcast and livestreaming company that still exists today and has done even better than when I was there, which we did very well then, it’s called This Week in Tech. It’s also known as TWiT. And everything we did at that time, which was about 20 weekly episodes of 12 different tech focused podcasts, we were also livestreaming it, exporting it into downloadable video, which at that time was a somewhat popular version of podcasting. So I have a little bit of background on this combination livestreaming and podcast although I haven’t been there for more than 10 years and things are always evolving. So I’m a little out of date in some things but I think that this is still relevant for a business to understand how to balance should you do mostly a podcast for your business or should you do it as a livestream as well.

Dane Golden:
So the first question is have you tried it yet. This a lot of people say, “Oh yeah, we’re going to totally take our podcasts and then we’re going to do it all live.” Well I will tell you, there are different elements to doing a livestream. I think it’s just more than turning on a camera. Now Gwen, I know you claim not to be a podcast expert but you’ve been on livestreams before. It’s a little bit different.

Gwen Miller:
Oh yes a thousand percent. And I will say every time I’ve been on a livestream podcast they have neglected to tell me it’s a livestream podcast. So I come in in plaid and no makeup and no hair done and they’re like cameras and I’m like, “Oh no.” And I do think it also affects how you perform. Especially to your point, if you’re new to podcasting, as you know my first couple of times guesting on podcasts it was very awkward. And let me tell you, I can tell you from doing a lot of work in video, that is my day job is video, you turning on a camera’s a lot different than flipping a switch on a microphone. People they see that camera, they freeze, they get a lot more stiff. So, unless you’re getting extreme value yeah from that video component people are going to be a lot more relaxed and open up a lot more if they’re just talking to you. It just happens every single time.

Dane Golden:
Right. But then there’s also technical elements that are a little bit different. You have to make sure if you’ve told people it starts at a certain time you have to make sure everyone’s ready at a certain time and all your tech is ready. And we know from testing just our guests sometimes we spend just a few minutes making sure they sound as good as possible because we want to present them as well as possible. And you know what, if you’re livestreaming you have to make sure they sound as good as they can and look as good. And there’s just a few more elements.

Gwen Miller:
Oh, for sure. And I have to say having done video for eons in many, many years moving over to podcasting has been way I just have to plug in a microphone and do some checks. Whereas once you add in that camera element, the lights and everything that goes into it, it’s a lot more of a heavy lift and can potentially discourage you from continuing to do it if you’re just starting out.

Dane Golden:
Yeah. And I actually, I didn’t put this in my list but I should say that I actually prefer to record the podcasts without seeing the guests or my co-host. So Gwen, I’m not looking at you, I’m just looking at a document and it’s like having a phone call and I think that that dynamic it’s a little bit less forced in some ways.

Gwen Miller:
I would agree with that yeah.

Dane Golden:
So now here’s the question, question number two, where do you want to livestream it? Some people automatically assume that since I’m focused on YouTube that I would say, “Hey, let’s do that livestream on YouTube.” But you could do it on Facebook, you could do it on Instagram, you could do it on LinkedIn, there’s a number of places you could do it. I think it’s important to think about that because I mean you could also do it all at the same time if you really wanted to.

Dane Golden:
But if you’re doing on Facebook where videos disappear after a few days, frankly I think it’s a little bit easier on your own ego and your company’s ego because for most businesses these livestreams will not get a number of views. It doesn’t matter how many awesome guests you have, it doesn’t matter how famous they are, if that thing you’ve put all this work and the livestream only gets 30 views you’re going to be bummed and your boss is going to be bombed. Now on Facebook it doesn’t live forever and whatever you did it’s gone and also if you made some errors or something it’s gone and I think that that’s a lower threshold.

Gwen Miller:
Yeah. Oh yeah, for sure. And when you’re doing something live yeah you want to be on the platform where you think you can get that engagement from people. You want to be on the platform that has the tools that might serve your podcast better. Each of these platforms the livestreaming options are slightly different and what you can do with it and how easy it is to actually do. So yeah your main platform might be one platform and your livestreaming platform might be another one.

Dane Golden:
Number three, if you’re livestreaming on YouTube do you have a big enough audience to drive live views? A lot of people view YouTube when it’s not live. Now there are some exceptions particularly in the YouTube educator space like we are in. So Tim Schmoyer, Nick Nimmin, Owen Video, Sean Cannell, will all do live on YouTube and all in a different way, very different way actually and not really all podcasts. So, if you’ve got a thriving YouTube channel you may indeed have enough people to get a non embarrassing view count on your live stream.

Dane Golden:
A lot of the businesses we work with are niche businesses that do really well on YouTube but they don’t have hundreds of thousands of views every week. And even if you’re small you might very well get good commenters to respond to that and that would help your podcast and all these things work together to grow. The live stream can grow the podcast and vice versa. But also if you’re a smaller channel you may not get that many views and again that may make you feel like you’re not getting a lot out of it. Do you get what I’m saying here? I don’t really know how to describe it but it’s like some sort of like you feel I don’t know if embarrassment or just you feel discouraged I guess is what I’m getting at.

Gwen Miller:
Well, even beyond that it’s a little bit of a waste. I’ve dealt with this a lot with companies and creators alike which is that you’ll be like, “Well, I have a couple of hundred thousand YouTube subscribers and my videos get 50,000 views a video.” And so, you expect to get a bunch of people to your livestream but you’ve got to realize that when you put up a regular video on YouTube that audience is trickling in over a week, weeks, a month and on their own schedule. When you do a livestream you’re cutting the top of your funnel to whoever is available at that very exact moment in time and happened to be on the platform. That is going to be a very small percentage of your audience.

Gwen Miller:
And then from there you’ve got your typical small click through rate. So you can very often be like, “This is going to be great.” But even if you have a decent size audience you often cannot push a significant live audience. And I have to say if that is the case then that effort that you’re putting into converting that podcast from audio only, which is much easier to video only, would probably be better being put into creating more actual on demand video content. Why put yourself through that A to your original point but B just from a cost perspective like a cost benefit perspective, put your time to the places where it’s going to have the most benefit for you.

Dane Golden:
Yeah, that’s right. And I’m on my fourth tip, will you have guests? So if you’re just doing it by yourself Sean Cannell for instance when I listen to his podcasts I don’t actually see the livestream. I haven’t seen his livestreams that have been turned into podcasts but I know he’s doing it because of the nature of how he’s talking about it. He’s talking about visuals and he does it with his team member. So he never has guests on a livestream. Tim Schmoyer often has guests on a livestream, Nick Nimmin often has guests on a livestream but he doesn’t turn those into podcasts. So, I think that it takes more work to get it right as we said before and I think that’s a key factor, right?

Gwen Miller:
Yeah and I think there’s an important distinction here. Are we talking guests like they walk into your studio or are we talking about guests like we have them in the time of COVID which is they’re on Zoom. I will say, I do have experience with this of converting essentially podcasts that are done via Skype or Zoom onto YouTube and it’s just hard. Everyone’s on Zoom all day. They don’t want to watch another Zoom call online, they just don’t. But then again, if you’re talking about again in the blessed future when we can actually do this again if you then require people to come into your studio you’re taking commitment which is like, “Hey, hop on the phone essentially with me for an hour we’re going to chat,” to, “You need to drive to my location, spend extra time getting your lighting set up, making sure you look good because now you’re on camera.” And instead of an hour commitment now that’s a four or five hour commitment. So you’ve just got to weigh that cost benefit.

Dane Golden:
That’s a really good point particularly with the entertainment folks that you deal with in LA.

Gwen Miller:
Oh yeah.

Dane Golden:
So number five, do your guests have good audio and camera? And we’re assuming here that the guests are all, for my purposes they’re all remote. Now everyone’s used to Zoom now over the past year and they’ve learned to do some basics quickly but not everyone looks great on Zoom. And when they know it’s going to be live streamed they’re going to want to look a little bit better. And there’s bad lighting, there’s bad framing, bad angles, a bad we could call it a bad set which means they might have a messy apartment behind them, there’s all sorts of things. And then there’s also, some people don’t want to wear earphones or earbuds and occasionally that can create echo on a recording later and that’s hard to remove from the podcast. And frankly, it’s generally women who don’t like the big what they call the pans or the big earbuds because that it messes with their hair basically.

Gwen Miller:
Not a great look.

Dane Golden:
Yeah, as someone who, I know someone who has worked with glam teams, do they want to have big funky headphones on?

Gwen Miller:
No. Heck no. I would never get any of my Hollywood talent to ever appear on camera that way. It’s hard enough to get them to appear on camera after two hours of hair and makeup, let alone like, “And now we’re going to crush your hair with these big gamer headphones.” It’s just not going to happen.

Dane Golden:
So, even though with our podcasts we always say when we invite people, “It’s not live and it’s not video.” And I say in not in big letters, in capital letters. Even so occasionally someone will show up on, we record these via Skype because we find the audio fidelity is just a little bit easier to deal with, someone will show up with their video and they’re all made up and I’m like, “I appreciate you putting on the makeup but we actually are just going to do audio.”

Gwen Miller:
I will actually take myself as an example for this question, just because look you and I have gone through this a lot over the last month or two as we’ve gotten into this process, the place in my house that is best for video is not the place in my house that’s best for audio. So as of this point, I’m essentially nestled inside my clothing right now which gives it a nice sound dampening effect which blocks out the freeway noise that’s on the other side of my apartment. So, if I turned on my camera right now there’s no way I’m appearing on a camera like I’m living in my clothing. But it’s so much better for the podcast experience.

Dane Golden:
Oh yeah and it really improved and that actually is a very common thing among podcasters is a clothes closet is actually one of the best insulated places. And some people, if they’re traveling at different hotels and if it’s a noisy type of environment or an echoey type of environment many podcasters will actually, and professionals like NPR and everything will tell them to do this. They’ll say, “Sit on your bed, put the blanket over your head and record that way.” So that’s just not going to fly with the video.

Gwen Miller:
I don’t know. No, I want to see all these as videos like just a bunch of people with blankets over their heads chatting. I would watch that.

Dane Golden:
It’s NPR blanket forts.

Gwen Miller:
Yeah.

Dane Golden:
So, then there’s the guest bandwidth issue and at work it wasn’t so much of a problem but now everyone’s working from home and they may have the son is on Zoom with one teacher, the daughter’s on Zoom with another teacher, wife or husband is on Zoom with their work. With video particularly now you may not be able to have the best video because there’s only so much bandwidth to go around in a single house, right? Insert response here.

Gwen Miller:
Exactly Dane. Look video is very heavy, right? When we’re talking back and forth on audio here that’s a different story. But yeah your video can glitch. It’s just not going to give you that pristine look that you would be getting from doing a video on demand on your channel for sure.

Dane Golden:
Number seven, how much time does it take your guests to be ready on camera? So we talked about that. So you work sometimes with these glam teams but on your average thing I mean if you think about it particularly women but even men I want to make sure that I’m presentable and I give a good image when I’m on a video podcast and I always ask if it’s a video. But do you think that even discourages some people from wanting to schedule to be on a podcast because they just know it’s going to take awhile for them to be presentable?

Gwen Miller:
Oh, for sure and especially if you want to get some, I don’t want to say a higher level of talent on your podcast but if you are going after anyone who has an exceptionally busy schedule that extra effort that it’s going to take it is likely going to prevent them from saying yes.

Dane Golden:
Good point. So does a livestream hurt or help your channel, your YouTube channel in particular? So you might think, “Hey, I’m going to put an hour long video of this livestream on my YouTube channel so people are going to watch it for an hour and this is going to get great watch time and it’s just going to really promote my channel.” Not always. I mean, if you’re Nick Nimmin yeah you might have people watching for two or three hours but if you’re doing something that’s not as engaging as what he’s doing you maybe have somebody watch for three minutes because the way you dialed up the beginning and then lead into it and maybe you were waiting around, people are just like, “Boring,” and they leave. That’s actually getting less watch time then maybe your six minute video that’s getting four minutes of watch time. So, it’s not really helping necessarily.

Dane Golden:
And also some people just, they just want to watch, as a business they just maybe want to watch the tutorials and they don’t want to watch the livestream. There’s a group of your viewers that are going to be like that. And I know that Tim Schmoyer has said publicly that he doesn’t promote his podcasts to the subscription feed and he doesn’t promote it to the notification feed. So there’s that button when you publish a video, there’s a checkbox that says publish to subscriber’s feed, subscription’s feed, and notify subscribers. He doesn’t do that which is interesting. So, that’s a different approach.

Gwen Miller:
Yeah look, I think my long standing position when people ask me, “Should I be livestreaming this concept or should I be doing an edited video?” There is a reason we edit videos. It’s a better user experience. So unless I always say there needs to be a reason it needs to be live. If there’s no audience interaction I say it should not be live. The only reason to do live is so you can interact directly with the audience back and forth. If you’re doing that that’s great. But even then you have to think is someone a week from now going to want to listen to me hemp and haw with people that they may not know with questions, they may not know with a lot of breaks and extra stuff. Would they rather watch this as an hour of what might be fun in the moment when you’re in the audience and asking questions back and forth may not be fun when you have to watch it for an hour when it really could have been a better, really tight 10 to 15 minute edited video.

Gwen Miller:
These are the things you have to think about. I know it’s so much easier and I think there’s a lot of temptation these days because yeah editing takes a lot of time. It’s so much easier to just be like, “I need to put up a video this week. I’m just going to block out an hour of my time and I’m going to make this video.” But instead of spending several days, you shoot it and then you have to edit and then there’s just so much that goes into it. I get that. But from a you want your channel to grow perspective you need to be very careful that you’re livestreaming for the right reasons.

Dane Golden:
Yeah and you talk about editing. That’s my number nine in a way because I ask are you going to cut down the livestream after it’s livestreamed with you tube’s own editing tool. And a lot of people, I mean most people just never talk about YouTube zone editing tool and that’s something you can edit to a degree of video that is already published. Now, YouTube doesn’t permit you to re-upload to replace any file, you have to just upload a new file and delete the old one. But one way around this is you can remove bits of the YouTube zone tool. And we have done this with some, let’s say huge events for some businesses where they’ve done major live events. And what happens with all these big events is that you have five minutes or some period before that says waiting, waiting, waiting, or coming up soon and that is a view killer. And I can tell you people don’t skip ahead, they don’t wait, they leave and that is a killer for the video.

Dane Golden:
So what you do, or what we’ve done is we just edit out to right at the point where it begins, right at the point where someone starts talking, and that may be five minutes, 10 minutes, an hour, 30 seconds, whatever. We just snip that out. And that is actually, that can double or triple your watch time because people don’t leave immediately. There are some variables and depending on how something is shot it actually can mess up the video because it can be out of sync. It really depends on a lot of factors and I don’t really claim to understand them. Usually it’s not, usually that’s not a problem, but you risk it and once you do that you can revert I believe but you’re messed up. So that’s one thing also when you cut down a livestream it removes the live chat so no one can look and see what was in the live chat.

Gwen Miller:
Yeah. I mean, that makes sense. Look, not to divert us at all but I do have to say I’m fascinated with YouTube’s new editing tools. And not a lot of really realize they’re there or the different things you could do with them. I actually have not thought of this use case. I have used it in the past if it’s like there is a brand deal that’s in a video and a lot of times companies like to do flights which traditionally in YouTube you can’t do. It bakes into a video. And it’s like you’re getting exposure for infinity which is also one of the selling points for the platform but certain brands do not want that. They just want, “Hey, I want this brand deal up for the next three months.”

Gwen Miller:
So we, I have in the past, used that tool to pull out those brand deals which has been very, very helpful. So we can actually offer that as a service to clients which is really helpful. But this is a case that I hadn’t thought of and is a little bit more complicated and to your point yes there are things that could get messed up. If you’re just going to cut out a bunch of, if you have music playing it’s going to sound pretty choppy but if you really are doing just a straightforward livestream where it’s just talking that is an interesting solution. And I’m really excited to see how as creators and businesses get their hands more on this tool and know it exists what other really amazing, interesting things they’re going to do with those tools.

Dane Golden:
Yeah and I believe Sean Cannell does this that he snips it because what I see him doing is his live streams start right away and most of the time you end up watching them long after the fact but because of his approach on some of his live streams which is no guests. And he’s very prepared and he just goes through a presentation and it could be 15, 20 minutes or whatever, and it just ranks and he’s designed them to rank for a certain topic like let’s say camera A or B or C. That can rank very high and for a very long period and so he’s actually taken this whole different approach to livestreaming but that’s not a podcast approach.

Dane Golden:
All right. So number 10, will your live stream drain audience from the audio only podcasts? And what I found, I had experimented with livestreaming a previous podcast, at the same time it was a video. So it was livestreamed, then it was embedded on the same webpage with a podcast. So people would know they would go to the podcast and they could choose from one or the other.
What I found was that the reverse of what you’d expect. So people say, “Gosh, if it’s got video the video must be the better option. So I’ll watch the video but because I don’t have that much time, I’m a busy business person, I never get around to allotting that one hour or whatever to watch. So, I never actually hear either. Because with a podcast I can do this while I’m driving, I can wash the dishes or walk the dog while I’m listening to a podcast.” It’s not as easy to do all that while you’re watching and so podcast fits into a niche that is this extra time you might have but video you’ve already spent your allotted video time and so it actually gives you less of an audience. What is your thoughts on that?

Gwen Miller:
No, I think you get at something really important which is this combination of FOMO and the paralysis of choice. Which is while logically in this case you should just say, “I don’t have a bunch of time. I should listen to the podcast.” But because you’re sitting there being with this FOMO of, “What if the video is better,” then you never end up consuming it. So to your point, sometimes having both options doesn’t expand your potential audience pool, it could literally diminish your available audience pool.

Dane Golden:
Right. And so here’s the question, is the video more engaging than the audio? That’s number 11. Just because it’s video doesn’t mean it’s more engaging than audio. So for instance, is there a reason to do the podcast as video? Like Scott Ayres, from Agorapulse for instance, he has funny orange hair so he puts on this weird orange wig where his hair sticks up two feet and he wears this white doctor’s coat and it’s really even though he’s just in his studio just like everyone else it’s actually just a really visually entertaining experience which is more than just the podcast. And I think his primary live stream platform is Facebook Live which I don’t know that I see him on YouTube livestreaming as much so that’s a reason why people should watch instead of listen. Sound good?

Gwen Miller:
Yeah. I mean look, yeah that’s a very good question is like what are you showing that’s so visually stimulating that you need to see this? Otherwise to your point, it’s just talking heads. Talking heads work on YouTube don’t get me wrong but if you look at any YouTuber that has become a successful longer of the style that’s just telling you engaging things with the camera it’s because their face is super interesting. If you’ve ever been in a room full of YouTubers there is a specific head shape and ways that light hits them and they’re all these bigger than life personalities. It’s like the weirdest Twilight zone thing if you walk into one of these rooms. And that’s a very small subset of people. Most of us are just normal human beings who we can hold an engaging conversation but we don’t exactly have clownish faces that are like cartoon characters so.

Dane Golden:
Speak for yourself. I have a clownish face.

Gwen Miller:
You were made for video Dane, what are you thinking? But yeah look, sometimes you are going to engage with people more just hearing their voice than seeing their face. It’s just we hear voices, we can put on them what we think their expressions are like and we can in some ways feel closer to them. If you’re going to be on video you better have a very animated face and vocal tones for that to reach across that camera.

Dane Golden:
Number 12, will you be discouraged if the video only gets 10 views? So we talked about this but this is the angle that I’m taking on this is that a podcast no one knows how many views a podcast has because it doesn’t say a view count on it. But the thing is, if you are a business and you have somebody watching tuning in every week for 20 or 30 minutes of listening to you talk you’ve built up this whole trust level and for some businesses where you may earn thousands of dollars from each customer each year, you may have just a handful of listeners can actually take you very far. And that’s why so many companies are podcasting is they’re finding it valuable. But if you had those just a small number like 10 views on your video people are going to say, “This person doesn’t know what they’re talking about.” But on a podcast people value you by what you say and not by your view count and that can drive huge business for you. So that’s my thinking. What are your thoughts?

Gwen Miller:
Yeah look, you see this debate going on a lot on YouTube which is like you should be making content that is designed for that platform. If it’s not designed specifically for that platform you’re just going to get less views and you may be okay with that. It can be maybe a lower stress way to make content that you still feel as connecting. And that is your level of appetite for the number of views you’re going to get. I think it also, what is the other content mix on that channel? You see a lot of the bigger channels they want to start a podcast but they know because they’ve been doing this for awhile that if they put that on their main channel it’s different than the type of content they usually put out and it’s not as engaging. So it’s going to be pulled out. But there are some super fans who may want to see it so they start a second channel.

Gwen Miller:
Now, if you’re a small business, it probably doesn’t make sense to have your business main channel and your business podcast channel but you’ll need to think seriously about how that’s going to affect your main channel and whether having a video on there that has 10 views versus maybe you get 5,000 views on your regular video how that’s going to look and how that’s going to affect your channel.

Dane Golden:
The big number 13, are you trying to make a podcast into a live stream or are you trying to make a livestream into a podcast? And this is actually important because basically if you’ve got a thriving YouTube channel that’s already livestreaming and you want to turn that into a podcast I’d say, “Go ahead. Why not? It’s not hurting your YouTube channel and clearly people are super interested.” So you get this whole other format to reach people and that’s what Tim Schmoyer does and Sean Cannell does and a few others in the YouTube educator space, which I follow closely. And I think they do very well with their approach but if you’re a podcaster and want to insert that same material into YouTube live stream I’d just be careful and take a look at these questions. It may be harder than you expect. Give it a try, try it a couple of times. There’s nothing wrong with experimenting a couple of times on your YouTube channel. And in fact I would say Gwen, you encourage that but often you want to know when an experiment is not working, right?

Gwen Miller:
For sure. You need to be testing. And I also want to add to what you were saying that look I think what is the difference if I start as a podcast, go to a live stream or go to a podcast, I think when you start as a live stream you have a lot of data from YouTube and the other platforms. You’re subconsciously optimizing for the platform. That is why your channel was successful. And then the thing is with the podcast side, as you stated, there’s not a lot of data. So, most of us are flying blind when it comes to how we make a podcast. So, it’s a lot easier to have optimized first for YouTube and then make that into a fairly successful podcast then take something that you’ve optimized based off essentially your gut feeling for a podcast and taking it back over to YouTube. And that’s going to be a lot harder to grow on a platform that is so data dependent. To your point, testing, testing, testing, see your data, see your data, see your data.

Dane Golden:
Yeah. So give it a try, see what happens. But you know what, if it’s not working out on YouTube be okay with it just being an audio podcast. So my name is Dane Golden with my co-host Gwen Miller and we want to thank you the listener for joining us today, right Gwen?

Gwen Miller:
Oh yes I love you all.

Dane Golden:
We love our listeners. Yay. And I want to thank you and invite you the listener. If you’re watching in the live stream which we don’t have then you’re a viewer but mostly you’re a listener. So I want to invite you to review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps other marketers and business owners find us. And check out our links on the show notes in your app. Remember to review us. You just have to click those three dots in your podcast app. We do this podcast and our other projects because we love helping marketers and business owners just like you do YouTube and video marketing better. Until next week here’s to helping you help your customers through video.