Scott Ayres Of AgoraPulse – Should You Do Facebook Live OR Facebook Premiere Videos

Scott Ayres Of AgoraPulse has been helping  companies and agencies manage their social media and how to get the best out of it. Today on the show Scott gives us some insight on whether you should be doing Facebook Live, Facebook Premiere or YouTube Live and how did he end up with that orange hair.

GUEST: Scott Ayres of AgoraPulse | Twitter | LinkedIn |  | FacebookInstagram | Facebook Live vs Facebook Premiere: Does It Matter?

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HOSTS: The Video Marketing Value Podcast is hosted by:
– Dane Golden of VidiUp.tv and VidTarget.io | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube
– Renee Teeley of VideoExplained and ReneeTeeley.com | LinkedIn | Twitter |
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SPONSORS: This episode is brought to you by our affiliate partners, including: TubeBuddyVidIQMorningFameRev.com, and other products and services we recommend.

PRODUCER: Jason Perrier of Phizzy Studios

TRANSCRIPT

Scott Ayres:
We help you manage all your social media, not just posting. So your content, but also managing everything coming in. So your messages, your comments, your retweets, your ad mentions everywhere on all the social sites, even YouTube comments. You got somebody who’s an agency who’s got 30 or 40 customers. They can do it all in one easy to use space, and you can assign different tasks to different team members. The coolest thing that just came out here recently is something called Power Reports. So these Power Reports are a nice, sexy way to show off the reports, they’re super simple, super easy, and you can shoot them right over from the app to whoever needs to get them.

Dane Golden:
It’s time for the video marketing value podcast. This is the podcast where we help marketers and business owners. Just like you get more value out of your video marketing efforts. My name is Dane Golden from VidiUp.tv, where we help you up your game on YouTube for business and transform your viewers into loyal customers. Also I’m from VidTarget.io where we help you get a higher return on your YouTube ad spend with targeted YouTube video placement lists, along with my cohost. She’s the powerhouse video marketer from San Francisco. It’s R-E-N double E, T double E-L-E-Y, Renee Teeley from VideoExplained. Hello, Renee.

Renee Teeley:
Hello Dane. Today I’m happy as a group of clowns exiting a tiny car to be co-hosting this podcast with you.

Dane Golden:
But are you thrilled?

Renee Teeley:
I’m thrilled, I’m delighted. I have all of the things.

Dane Golden:
She’s all the things. Renee, what do you do at Video Explained?

Renee Teeley:
I do all the things, at VideoExplained I offer video production and consulting services to help companies use video to build credibility, generate leads, and convert those leads into paying customers.

Dane Golden:
Okay, and for you, the listener, you should know that as always, you can follow along in your app. We’re going to have links to transcripts and links, and we’re going to have all sorts of stuff and if you like, send us a tweet on Twitter, send us a message on Facebook, send us whatever you want. LinkedIn, we’re all over that place. Renee and I would love to know how you like this show. Today we have a special guest, it’s Scott Ayres of AgoraPulse. Welcome, Scott.

Scott Ayres:
Hey, great to… I need an intro like that. Like Scott, S-C-O double T, A-Y-R-E-S or something like that. Yeah, that was a great entrance. [inaudible 00:02:39] be on the show with you guys. We’re not virtually seeing each other in person or in person, so it’s good to catch up with you guys again.

Dane Golden:
Absolutely. He’s S-C-O double T, A-Y-R-E-S.

Scott Ayres:
There you go. That’ll be my new intro.

Dane Golden:
Scott Ayres, we asked you the video marketing value podcast today because at AgoraPulse, you guys do multiple things really well, from my perspective. You’re a great social media management software, but also really great branding. Then you have this whole Facebook video thing going on for particularly Facebook Live. So importantly, you guys also do a lot of studies where you test various strategies and tactics on how to get the most out of your social media. You did this study recently to compare Facebook Live and its effectiveness versus Facebook Premiere. So it’s a lot of stuff, but is this all type of stuff you’re good talking about this type of stuff today?

Scott Ayres:
Yeah, I think it’ll be a fun conversation because way we’re doing some testing that a lot of people probably aren’t bothering the tests. So that’s my job is just to test a weird stuff, like you have done some of your studies as well.

Renee Teeley:
Well, I like talking about testing weird stuff, so I am excited for this episode. All right, so let’s talk a little bit about AgoraPulse for a minute. So I know that there’s a lot of people out there who know about you, know about the company, but for those who don’t, can you just briefly tell us about AgoraPulse the platform and how it helps marketers?

Scott Ayres:
Yeah, I mean, what we do basically is we help you and your team. We’re really primarily for teams. We can be individual and do it, but most of our customers tend to have a team of some sort, whether that’s an agency they run or within their own company. We help you manage all your social media, not just posting. So your content, but also managing everything coming in. So your messages, your comments, your retweets, your ad mentions everywhere on all the social sites, even YouTube comments. So most of it is the management side for people, especially if you think you got somebody who’s an agency who’s got 30 or 40 customers, they can do it all in one easy to use space, and you can assign different tasks to different team members. And the coolest thing that just came out here recently is something called Power Reports because I think most people, especially agencies struggle getting reports out to their clients, or if you work with in-house getting reports over to your boss. So these Power Reports are a nice, sexy way to show off the reports, they’re super simple, super easy, and you can shoot them right over from the app to whoever needs to get them. That’s a new cool feature that within the app.

Scott Ayres:
In addition to that, there’s listening features, there’s all kinds of stuff you can do, and you can actually grab a free trial if you go to agorapulse.com/lab, so agorapulse.com/lab, you get a free 28-day trial. Our team is amazing, I don’t want to say that because I worked for the company, but I used the product before I came working here four years ago. The support team, the sales team, everybody who is there is the best people I’ve ever worked with in my life.

Dane Golden:
We’re just going to spell that out for you. A-G-O-R-A-P-U-L-S-E.com/lab. Before we talk about Facebook Live and Premiere videos, let’s talk about your hair for a second. So this, we usually don’t spend a lot of time with hair on this podcast.

Scott Ayres:
Wonder why.

Dane Golden:
I don’t have any and Renee’s is always perfect. So it’s not really a topic, but just to narrate for the listener who may never have seen you and it’s their first time hearing from you. You have bright orange hair, bright, bright, bright orange. It’s technically not your real hair, but tell us why you do this and how it’s affected your branding at AgoraPulse.

Scott Ayres:
It’s a secret, it is my real hair, no.

Dane Golden:
It is not.

Scott Ayres:
So here, here’s the interesting story and actually, I’m in the middle of testing some stuff with the wig and with my animated character, I’m going to talk about here in a second. So when we created the lab, we decided we wanted to have this scientific look to it and feel. So we created this little animated character, which again, you’re on a podcast so I can’t show you, but a little character we made. Then we probably were running with that for about a year and a half, two years just for the blog posts and podcasts. We weren’t doing live shows or anything like that at that point.

Scott Ayres:
Then one day I was… We have company meetings, our company is based out of Paris, France, and video meetings. So I decided, I’m going to buy a cheap orange wig and a lab coat off of Amazon and just show up to the virtual meeting dressed up. I popped my face in and turned the camera on, everybody just died laughing. Thought, oh my gosh, I can’t believe you just did that. Screenshots like crazy were going around everywhere.
Then so fast forward a month or two, and our CEO said, “Hey, I want you all to start doing a live video show for the social media lab. Ive hired a guy named Owen Video to come do the show with you. Oh, thanks.” So we started talking about doing it. This is in probably December of 2018. So I said, “What if I dress up? What if I put on the wig and put on a lab coat and do the show like that?” My boss was like, “Do you really want to do that?” I’m like, “Why not?” Because me and a baseball cap and a t-shirt, you’re going to forget pretty quickly unless it’s the same hat, t-shirt every time maybe it’s branding or something like that. You’re going to forget it, where this orange wig and the lab coat after you’ve seen it a couple of times, you recognize and you know who this is and more importantly, what we wanted and what I wanted was to have that brand recognition throughout the industry really quickly and easily.

Scott Ayres:
How that played out in a really cool way was social media marketing world 2019. I think it was the first event I’d ever gone to dressed up. So I’m walking around what, 5,000, 6,000 people, however many there are there and I’m walking through. Actually our head of sales is like, “Come with me.” She made me zigzag through all the chairs in the entire auditorium so everybody saw me. Everybody’s laughing and stuff. I sit down up towards the front and Mike Stelzner does his opening keynote, Mike Stelzner is the founder and CEO of Social Media Marketing World and Social Media Examiner. He’s talking about live video and he’s like, “There’s some great shows out there that are doing great live video and here’s an example of one, Social Media Lab,” and boom, there’s my face in the orange wig in the lab coat on the screen in front of 5,000, 6,000 of my peers. We were like, holy crap, for one getting mentioned by him in the keynote is a pretty big deal, but just to put that face out there, it changed things so, so quickly for us because the next two days, I think I smiled a thousand times for selfies because I’m six-foot tall, big Texan walking around with a wig on.

Scott Ayres:
So it immediately, by the time that the event was over, my CEO came over and he was a Frenchman named Emery. He was like, “I can’t believe you pulled that off and it was amazing. We barely spend any money on that.” It was free advertising, basically in essence. I mean, now everybody knows orange hair guy, AgoraPulse, it connects automatically. Now I’ve gotten to speak at events. I think when I met you two was that Video Marketing World. I was able to get on stage there for a panel discussion there.
But the hair sticks out. It’s a big selling point for us, even when I’m pitching events, I always put it on, people are going to remember, people are going to take more pictures of me on stage than anybody else, and they’re going to remember it and that’s what you want. They’re going to hashtag it, they’re going to post it to wherever their social media is at about your event. So it’s a selling pitch for me now at this point too, to get to events and get on stage.

Dane Golden:
Amazing.

Scott Ayres:
They’re going to remember it.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah. Well, I think it’s pretty courageous of you, but also brilliant because I mean, we were talking before the podcast that instantly I remembered you because of the orange hair. Yeah, we met a Video Marketing World when you were wearing the orange hair, it just stands out so well. So yeah, it’s just fantastic. Do you feel awkward when you don’t have it and you’re on camera?

Scott Ayres:
A little bit because no one recognizes me. I took it off for you guys right before we got on and when you started recording, you’re like, “Oh wow. Yeah, I don’t recognize you.”

Renee Teeley:
Totally different person.

Scott Ayres:
So people don’t recognize me, which is nice but also weird at the same time, because you want to be known for you and your content and that sort of stuff, but yeah. It’s weird but it’s also, I mean, it takes a lot to go and do the first. I’m an extroverted guy, but the first couple of times it was a lot of deep breaths like, all right, I’m fixing to through the Marriott in San Diego with this big wig on and everything and go to the conference. I had a little kids stopping me to take pictures. They thought I was Syndrome from the Incredibles.

Renee Teeley:
Oh, I can see that yeah.

Scott Ayres:
Or a troll dog. I get Syndrome and I get a troll doll quite a bit. I tell everybody I’m a little bit closer to Beaker more than anything. He had the orange chair in a lab coat on, at least. I’m at least really close to Beaker, but so yeah, now it’s I have to gear up for it at first. Then once I just walk out the door, I’m in character and I don’t bat an eye. It gets hot and my head hates me at the end of the night and my forehead will hate me, has a big line across it. It’s like, oh.

Dane Golden:
You’re the first person to say on this podcast that your head hates you.

Scott Ayres:
Yeah, it does sometimes, yeah. So for many reasons, but that’s just one of them.

Renee Teeley:
Well, I think it’s fantastic and yeah, brilliant in terms of marketing, because everybody’s looking for ways to stand out. So you clearly have done a good job with that.
So switching gears a little bit before we dive in and talk about your study, which I’m very excited to hear about. I want to talk for a moment about, what is the difference between Facebook Live and Facebook Premiere? So most of our listeners are marketers and business owners and they specialize in doing video on one platform or another. So it could be YouTube or paid media, Instagram, lots of different platforms out there, but can you help us understand the difference between Facebook Live and Premiere videos?

Scott Ayres:
Yeah. So a Facebook Live would be whatever software you might use or you go right on Facebook itself, or maybe from your phone and you just push the button, you go live. So you’re live talking to people, talking to the camera and the comments are coming in, you can respond to them live, if you’re using software, you can pull them, any of the comments into the screen typically. So you can engage with your audience and have the fun conversation, but it’s right there live. There’s no pause button. You can’t stop and then rerecord. It’s just, whatever you say is going to happen, whatever. I have some stuff behind me, if it were to fall over during my live video show, everybody would see it, who’s watching the show. So Facebook, it’s been really hot in the last few years, as most people probably know and YouTube Live as well, because it’s just a different platform and it gets really high reach. Facebook loves it, and they really put it out there because they’re trying to compete with YouTube so hard that they really have given live a huge, huge platform. So we’ve got live and that’s live live, I guess we should say.

Scott Ayres:
Then you have Facebook Premiere, and what Facebook Premiere is, is you record a video, you edit it, you do whatever fancy stuff you want to do to get it all buttoned up. Then you premiere it like you might a new movie at the cinema and you schedule a time on your page, and I’m talking about business pages. I believe you can do it on profiles. I’m only talking about business pages here. You schedule a time when it was going to show and premiere on Facebook, in essence kind of sort of live because the audience… because people come and watch it and comment. They’re all watching the same exact part. So you can’t fast forward and rewind it during that period because it’s got to play through once before users can go back and fast forward and rewind. So in essence, it’s like you’re all over the world watching this recorded video together live, but there’s no interaction from the person on camera with the audience. So they can’t read the comments, they can’t engage with them in that way. Now you can’t engage in the comment section, but you can’t do what you normally do in a live like, “Hey, Dane, I appreciate you commenting. Hey, thanks for watching, Renne.” No, you can’t do that sort of stuff with a premiere.
So that’s the difference. So I mean a premiere might be a little bit more buttoned up and for me in this test, it definitely was because it was, I recorded, I rerecorded, I edited it, I added graphics, sound effects, did a lot of playing around with it to make it feel like our live show quite a bit. Where a live show, you just go and there’s no edit button until afterwards where you can trim a little bit on the front and the back.

Dane Golden:
So why did you want to do this test? What were you trying to accomplish and learn?

Scott Ayres:
Well yeah, I really did want to do this test at the beginning. Here’s what happened, when COVID hit and I’m in Texas and in April, we started having the lockdowns and it was all mandated, no travel, this sort of stuff. We weren’t supposed to travel outside of our city limits in the little small town I live in. My office that I go to where I have good internet because good internet is crucial for a live video show, is about 35, 40 miles away and it’s in another city, another county because my home internet in the tiny town in Texas I live in doesn’t even have broadband yet, we’re still on DSL. So I can’t do live from my house.
So I got to this weird spot. I’m like, okay, I want to keep doing the live show because I don’t want to lose that Wednesday audience that knows to come to our page and engage with the live show. So I started going, hey, what if I tried this Premiere’s out during the meantime? Then of course, everything I do in the labs, the test of some sort, I’m like, hey, why don’t we test this to see if there’s any difference in the engagement and the reach and all that stuff between the Premiere video and a Live video. So that’s how, it came out of necessity is what really it came out of for me but I always think, take those happy accidents and then use them some way to use maybe it’s content. I’m always thinking about content. So it’s a small test. It wasn’t a huge test by any means, but something fun to try out because no one else had really been trying them out much.

Renee Teeley:
So what were your findings from the study? What was the difference in engagement?

Scott Ayres:
Yeah, so what we looked at, we did four videos that are Premiere and four videos that were Live. The thing too, anytime you’re testing, if anybody’s listening who tests stuff on social media, and Dane know this from that huge study you did on the word you. You’ve got to remove all the anomalies you possibly can.

Dane Golden:
Yeah, it’s almost impossible, but you try to make it as equal as possible.

Scott Ayres:
Yeah, you want to try to do everything… so for something like this, I’m not tagging anybody, I’m not using hashtags, I’m not doing watch parties or anything like that with it. Wasn’t sharing them on other social networks before it happened. So trying to get as close as possible. So we end up with four videos that we did Premiere, four videos that were Live. So when it was all said and done, here, we’ll talk percentages because it’s easier, especially on a podcast to wrap your head around percentages. So we look at the Facebook Live show compared to Facebook Premiere. Reach was 7.68% higher on the Live versus the Premier reactions were 29-

Dane Golden:
Could you say what you’re defining is reach and reactions?

Scott Ayres:
Sure, reach would be on Facebook. Facebook says reach is how many people saw the post or saw the video. So that’s what reach would be. Reactions is going to be people, they can like, they can love, they can sad face it, they can angry face it. I think now we have care is the new little emoji that you can do. So that’s what reactions are. So reactions were a little over 29% higher. Comments, and this was the huge one. Comments were 188% higher on the Live video compared to the Premiere, which goes back to what I was saying earlier, where as a Live video producer or host, I can talk to my audience and pull in, get them, “Hey, why don’t you all comment this,” or, “Hey, if you’ve done this before, say yes,” that sort of thing. You can do it some in a Premiere, but people are less likely to engage with it, based on the study we’ve got here. One minute-

Dane Golden:
So if you said you’ve had 188% better. Does that mean if you had a hundred of them before you’d actually have 288 after the comparison, or you’d have 101 and a hundred and 188 in the other?

Scott Ayres:
Well, let’s say for example, when we average all four of the videos together of each, we average 25 comments on the Premiere. On the live we averaged 72. So it’s three times as much.

Dane Golden:
So you’re tripling, you’re tripling?

Scott Ayres:
Yeah, it’s tripling is what it did. So that’s how it would work. Percentages sometimes do get a little weird, but tripling might be an easier way to say that there. Then on top of that we got more one minute views, which is a metric you want to look at on Facebook videos to see if people are watching a least one minute, because I hate this. I’m going on a rant [inaudible 00:20:41].

Dane Golden:
No rants. This is a no rant zone. No, go ahead.

Scott Ayres:
Facebook’s view count is something I looked at, but I hate their view count because they count a three-second view as a view. That’s not a view, that just means you probably paused for three seconds on your news feed on your phone when you were thumbing through the feed, but Facebook counts that as a view. So that makes you feel good. Makes you feel like you’ve got some big number when in reality, you probably don’t.

Scott Ayres:
So that’s why I like looking at… On this for me, the big key factor for me to see which one did better. I wanted to look at reach, but I’ll also want to look at comments. Comments was probably my most important one, being that three times as high. That’s what you want for a Facebook Live. Facebook Live videos and Facebook videos in general, I think are primarily, especially longer form videos, they’re about the community. They’re about getting engagement. They’re about getting people to react. That way the next thing you publish after this video, they’re more likely to see it because they just touched your last piece of content. You publish a link to some blog posts or a product or whatever it might be. The way the algorithm works they’re more likely to see it now because they just engage with that. So I’m always trying to find ways to get people to comment during a live video. In the Premiere, you can kind of do it, but it doesn’t work the same. On all of them that we did, and I’ve done even after this test, they don’t get the comments because there isn’t that engagement, there isn’t that one-on-one feel like I’m talking to Dane who’s sitting on the bus watching live or whatever. So that’s what you want, you want those comments.

Dane Golden:
Tell us, you guys do Facebook Live multiple times per week. How did this influence what you do?

Scott Ayres:
Well I mean, for me, it means that I would probably steer away from these Premiere’s, unless it was maybe… say for us it was product wise for AgoraPulse. Maybe we premiere a video of a feature that we add or something like that and everybody can watch it together, but for me trying to… Because at the time all the videos were me talking about experiments that I had run. For me to talk about the experiments during the Premiere didn’t have as much value as doing it on a Live video. So I mean, we’ve doubled down on live videos because we see the reach difference overall, other post types, that we have on our page. Live is always tremendously higher compared to say a link post because people don’t engage with those, they engage with a Live video.

Scott Ayres:
Even today, I’ve probably watched four Live videos on Facebook today alone because they’re engaging. It’s people I know in the industry and I want to go comment. I want my face on the screen, they’ll pop up in the comments. So Live video, there’s something about it that people, especially if you’ve got a tribe of people who are constantly engaging with you, they want to come back and see their face. They want to say, “Hey Bob, Hey Deb.” That’s what the live video tends to do for most brands out there that are doing it right anyway.

Renee Teeley:
So just to clarify for our audience and for myself frankly, because I think this is really valuable information. It sounded like when you did the test, Facebook Live got better reach, more people watching, and better engagement? So everything favored Facebook Live, is that correct?

Scott Ayres:
That’s correct. Yeah, so that traditional Facebook Live did much better than the Facebook Premiere, which is basically you uploading a prerecorded video, is what Premiere is.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah, that’s just amazing in that it went out on all of the metrics. So that’s pretty incredible. What are some other tips that you can give marketers and business owners about how to use Facebook Live better?

Scott Ayres:
I’m testing right now, countdown timers. You see a lot of people do countdown timers when they go live on their Facebook page and there’s a couple of reasons for it. One, it lets you maybe do other stuff like if you’re doing watch parties on Facebook or you’re posting the link to Twitter or wherever else. It gives you a chance to do that while it’s live. What I mean by a countdown timer is, it’ll be a video playing with a clock it’s countdown and usually you’re not on camera with it. Some people do it with them on camera as well, which is fun. I just do one that’s just a video that I made and it’s got music plump blaring and then the countdown timer is coming in. There’s a little messages coming across saying hey, we’ll be live in a few minutes.

Scott Ayres:
So the countdown timers is something I would look at because what that does for… otherwise, other than giving you that chance to do other tasks, what it’s doing as well is giving people time to come over and see that notification because the worst thing a lot of people do, and I hate this is, they’ll go live and they’ll sit there and stare at the camera. Are we on? Okay, I’m going to wait for someone, people to get here, and they don’t say anything. Don’t do that, don’t do that. Just go live and start talking whenever you go live. Most people who are going to watch your live video anyway, are probably going to watch the replay. They’re not going to be watching it live, but the timers though, give you the opportunity for that notification to kick in and people can come over to it. I see… I don’t want to mention names just in case they’re your competitors or anything, but I see some people doing [crosstalk 00:26:01]-

Dane Golden:
No, mention anyone. Mention it, we’re not competitors.

Scott Ayres:
You know these guys probably, Live Streaming Pros, David and Luria do Live Streaming Pros. They do a 10 minute timer and theirs is an overlay and Luria is usually behind it dancing around to the music and doing stuff and talking to people in the comments. They do a 10 minute because they’ve understood and they’ve known by the data that, there’s something about going that live that long that triggers the algorithm and makes it show up in the Facebook watch, it makes it show up in different places. So the timers are something I would probably play around with. I’m testing a two minute and a five minute right now to see which one gives me better… Did my peak live viewers hit faster and differently while I’m those? So that’s one thing to look at and test.
But other than that, I think having a plan, having what I call a run of show or a rundown, whatever you might call it, plan out your show. Don’t just go live Willy nilly and try to wing it because you’re going to fail. You’re going to get stuck and you’re going to have a lot of um’s, and what you want to talk about. So have some idea and outline of what you’re going to talk about.

Scott Ayres:
Then find ways to get people to engage. Like we were with this test, comments were so high because I had the opportunity during the live to get people to comment. You want those comments, those comments are like on Facebook, other than a share, share’s worth probably more value than anything, if somebody shares your posts, but comments are like gold to me. There are people taking the time to type in something either on their phone or their desktop and engage with you. That does trigger that algorithm. So say stuff like, give them yes or no questions, do trivia, ask them where they live. Hey, where are you watching from? Everybody can answer that. So it’s not something they have to think about and they just do it without thinking about it. Again, you’re triggering that algorithm as soon as you do that and they start engaging, or, Hey, like bomb Dane in his comments, they start doing the reactions. So find ways to get people engaged in your video as much as you can while you are live, but also get to the point. Don’t terry around, don’t go an hour if you could go 30 minutes, respect people’s time, but sometimes you can get away with 30 minutes and be done. Sometimes you can do it in 20 minutes and be done. It doesn’t have to be an hour, hour and a half long show every time.

Scott Ayres:
So just know that, but also stick to consistency of your time, your day. We’ve done our show on Wednesdays now for, I mean, I don’t even know, we’re going on to two years almost now. I did move the time here recently up an hour, but every Wednesday, everybody knows Social Media Labs, Social Media Labs, Social Media Lab. So that’s some consistency things that you definitely want to make sure you’re doing.
Then share the video out wherever, watch parties are cool, if you don’t know, watch parties are, you can watch a video and “along with people” on your profile or in a group or on another business page that you might have. The stats, if somebody is watching it in a watch party, those stats actually transfer over to your actual video.

Dane Golden:
Wow.

Scott Ayres:
The comments won’t come in so you can’t see the comments unless you’re watching the watch party. You can’t pull them on screen, but let’s say you got 10 people watching your video in a watch party in a group, that actually counts towards your peak viewers and your unique viewers and everything. So it’s an interesting thing to play around with. Now, granted some of that’s vanity metrics, but that also probably is triggering something in the algorithm that is going to make them see more of your videos later on. So that’s something that I’m constantly doing. This week I’m actually not doing watch parties and I’m simulcasting and going live on six or seven different places at the same time on Facebook, just to see what that does. So it’ll be interesting to play around with stuff like that.

Dane Golden:
Amazing. You guys are doing so many amazing things with Facebook Live and with the studies you’ve done, you’ve done so many over time and people should look into that. So Scott Ayres, how can people find out more about you and AgoraPulse and your Facebook Live streams and podcasts and other things you do?

Scott Ayres:
Yeah, you can find everything where we wrote about at AgoraPulselab.com. That’s AgoraPulse, A-G-O-R-A. I can spell it again for you. AgoraPulselab.com is where you find us. We have social media accounts, AgoraPulse Lab, but I use them for testing grounds a lot, so it’s not always consistent posting, but yeah, if you go there, if you also go to socialmedialab.group, socialmedialab.group, you can join our private Facebook group. We have a lot of fun in there, ask questions, and there’s about 1,500 people in there and we hang out. I ask them goofy questions all the time to try to get them to talk and I’m testing them. They just don’t realize they’re a part of the experiment but they are.

Dane Golden:
I’m going to be joining that group. I can’t believe I’m not in that. So I’m going to, joining that. So thank you, Scott Ayres. My name is Dane Golden with my co-host she’s R-E-N double E, T double E-L-E-Y. Renee Teeley, and we want to thank you, the listener, for joining us today. Right, Renee?

Renee Teeley:
Yes, absolutely. Today I want to leave you with a quote, as I once told my good friend, Seth Godin, “Don’t find customers for your products, find products for your customers.” That’s really how you’re going to have the biggest impact and the greatest chance of success.

Dane Golden:
This is like the first person you’ve mentioned in one of these little end quotas is that you give, that you probably have actually met.

Renee Teeley:
Well, last week I mentioned Ann Handley.

Dane Golden:
Oh, okay. That’s true. That’s true.

Renee Teeley:
Yeah, so I’m making the rounds.

Dane Golden:
Very good, very good.

Renee Teeley:
Real people, yeah.

Dane Golden:
I want to invite you to review us on Apple podcast and if you can’t find that review button, click that share button. It’s right where the review button should have been. Give them a little tweet or whatever about the Video Marketing Value podcast. Renee and I do this podcast and our various other videos projects and all these things that we do because we love helping marketers and business owners, just like you do YouTube and video marketing better. Thanks to our special guest Scott Ayres. Thank you, Scott.

Scott Ayres:
You bet. Thanks for having me on, it was fun.

Dane Golden:
So great, until next week, here’s to helping you help your customers through video.